Friday, May 14, 2010

Friday Funnies

When I was a kid, I remember watching Red Skelton on the tube. If my memory serves me correctly, I think he was on Monday nights. But no matter, he was one of the last of the great vaudevillian style comedians. Here is but a slice of what you saw, if you watched his show:



Many people today would say he was corny and not funny. But I say they don't make them like this anymore.

12 comments:

Leslie said...

That is so funny! Laughing out loud

Z said...

I watched and remembered (a little :-) and wondered if his cute going from foot to foot and hands kind of clenched stuff is real or nerves or put on!? Such clean jokes and all so funny!
I think if America had a few of these types of shows again, we'd all be a lot happier. Carol Burnett, for example? THOSE were the days!

Anonymous said...

Mr. Skelton was a Tippecanoer. I wonder if he got his sense of humor once he moved to California.

Your best friend,

Eric Cartman

Mustang said...

These were the days before terrorism when comedians could pantomine monkeys without suddenly jumping up and down shouting Allah Akbar.

I watched Red Skelton all the time; my favorite character of his was Clem Caddiddlehopper. You know, he began his entertainment career as a clown, which makes sense if you watch his performances close enough.

Semper Fi

Chuck said...

I agree with my twin Z, I was thinking of Carol Burnett also. I thought these people were hysterical. It says a lot for them that they could be this funny without the need for the shock value of profanity.

I just barely remember him, for the record ;-)

LASunsett said...

Leslie,

I am glad you liked it. It just so happens that Cartman the little snert is correct. Old Red was from Vincennes, my grandmother went to school with him, but he was ahead of her so they weren't as close as others. They knew of each other, who each was...blah blah.

LASunsett said...

//I think if America had a few of these types of shows again, we'd all be a lot happier.//

Back then... comedy was trying to make people forget about the tough world, the problems, etc. Now comedy infuses everyday stuff and tries to make it funny. I like a happy medium between the two.

LASunsett said...

//You know, he began his entertainment career as a clown, which makes sense if you watch his performances close enough.//

Lucille Ball was the female version of Skelton. They were masters of their art.

LASunsett said...

//I just barely remember him, for the record //

That's okay Chuck, if your conscience doth not condemn you, then neither will I. (wink, wink, nudge, nudge)

I also remember when the Flintstones were in the 7:30 network slot on Friday nights. The Judy Garland Show, Jackie Gleason. I was a kid and watched them with the grown-ups.

Anonymous said...

My favorite was Debbie Does Dallas.

Gunny

Anonymous said...

Honest, First Sergeant. The last statement was NOT from me. Someone is assuming my identity again. I think it's the Colonel. You know how he likes to drive wedges between the enlisted men.

Gunny Actual

LASunsett said...

Gunny,

I know the Colonel has his little idiosyncrasies and can be a pain at times. He can be obstinate and difficult to work under. But in no way does he try to create a schism between the enlisted men. You may have forgotten...he was one at one time.

I have traced the IP address back to Cartman. He is your culprit. You must reel him in before he does more significant damage to the morale of the troops. This is an order, you have 24 hours.