Tuesday, February 14, 2006

More Evidence That Shows Precisely Why Turkey Should Not Be Allowed Into The EU

Enter into the record in the court of public opinion this story from the IHT. Here is a brief excerpt:
Sam William Marshall, played by Billy Zane, is portrayed as a sociopath, killing people without a second thought and claiming that he is doing God's will, a thinly veiled reference to statements by President George W. Bush about America's "crusade" for democracy in Iraq and the Middle East.

So, tell me. What happened to Turkey being pro-western, being more European than Asian, and having the values of a freedom-loving European society, despite being predominently Muslim?

I cannot say that this doesn't surprise me, though. The leftists in this country have paved the way for this kind of attitude, with Hollywood being one of the chief catalysts in this reaction.

6 comments:

SuperFrenchie said...

I am for the entry of Turkey in the EU. It has the potential of remaking the Middle East in a much deeper way than the Iraq war ever did or ever will.

However, I am also for very high standards for joining. Having candidate countries change and adapt themselves to those high standards is what will make them become the model for the Middle East.

Having said that, it is very clear that Turkey is nowhere near being ready to abide by those high standards. It will probably take another 20 years before they are. We should however continue to dangle membership as an encouragement to change their ways.

Both Turkey and the EU (and the US as well) have everything to gain from it.

LASunsett said...

//It will probably take another 20 years before they are. We should however continue to dangle membership as an encouragement to change their ways.//

Do you really think that they are going to wait that long? I believe they will lose interest before then. They are starting to get restless now.

SuperFrenchie said...

LAsunset: it’s not up to them to decide when they will be allowed to join. For info, Turkey first applied for membership in... 1957. And was accepted as an Associate Member in 1963.

That agreement provided for full membership in the future, provided that certain obligations be fulfilled. If all of them have not been fulfilled (and they have not, Cyprus comes to mind), then they should not be allowed to join. But what they have done so far shows what the EU can do. Teh Turks have abolished the death penalty and reformed their entire justice system just because they want to join.

We have not spent a single dime in Turkey, and they’re doing what we want them to do. Compare that to the enormous resources (both human and treasure) you are spending in Iraq mostly for getting almost exactly what you would never want them to do (becoming an Iran ally).

LASunsett said...

// For info, Turkey first applied for membership in... 1957. And was accepted as an Associate Member in 1963.//

I am well aware of the history of this thing. What I wanted to know was, how much longer you think dangling that carrot is going to work?

//Compare that to the enormous resources (both human and treasure) you are spending in Iraq mostly for getting almost exactly what you would never want them to do (becoming an Iran ally).//

I thought Turkey was the subject.

SuperFrenchie said...

// how much longer you think dangling that carrot is going to work?//

Oh, they won’t last very much longer. Not because the carrot is unattainable (it is not), but because they see that no matter what they do, they will keep being turned down by populations who don’t want them.

See, I said that it would be a good thing for them to join. But I’m in the minority. Most French for example (something like 65%) disagree with me. Plus, this cartoon thing did not exactly help, as you pointed out. And since France is on the record for saying that they will put the Turkey question to a referendum, because the EU needs unanimity for that kind of decision, it’s simply not going to happen.

That’s too bad, but that’s the reality.

Shah Alexander said...

Turkey is a secular state, and on it’s way towards democracy. However, continual reject would invigorate Islamism in this country. Also, NATO will focus more on Central Asia. A Turkey at the heart of Europe will bring psychological advantage to the Western alliance.

Current Turkey is a kind of odd man out in Europe. This is not because of their religion, but because of their incomplete democracy. EU entry will stimulate reforms in Turkey, I believe.