Saturday, December 01, 2007

Wanted: Person With Or Without Knowledge

Some jobs are pretty open when it comes to the experience level and the knowledge base of the applicant. That's not so bad, if we are talking about sales of hardware, potato chips, or other such items. But we'd like to think that when we are getting information, the one putting out the information is a person that knows something about the information being put out.

If I am watching a segment with medical and health advice, I would hope that the person would be a doctor or some other healthcare professional related to the topic at hand. Can we imagine a grocery store cashier telling us all what treatment regimens work best to treat lymphoma? Better yet, how about a bartender teaching us about what lab values are critical in diagnosing cirrhosis of the liver?

Take CBS for example, they have placed an ad for an eco-beat reporter.

“CBS is expanding its coverage of the environment,” the ad reads. “We seek a talented reporter/host for Internet video broadcast. We are looking for smart, creative, hard working up and comers, who can bring great energy, creativity and a dash of humor to our coverage. A deep interest in the environment and sustainability issues will serve you well.”

So you would think such a job would require a science background or years of covering environmental news? Not exactly.

“You are wicked smart, funny, irreverent and hip, oozing enthusiasm and creative energy,” the ad reads. “This position requires strong people, reporting, story telling and writing skills. Managing tight deadlines should be second nature. Knowledge of the enviro beat is a big plus, but not a requirement.”


If you have any questions as to why CBS is dead last in the ratings, this may help you to understand it better. Credibility is the problem and it has been, since the big Memogate scandal.

I would think a person with a strong ecological background would be the first requirement. But when we see with Al Gore running the show in this global warming cult, we realize that isn't a pre-requisite. Al is a lawyer and politician by trade, yet ask any global warming cult member and they'll tell you, he is the premier expert in this field.

All that matters is, a person needs to be funny and irreverent to get the pre-determined message out. It doesn't matter that there is no consensus in the real scientific world, just be funny and outgoing. We'll tell you what to say.

Now go get 'em killer.

Knock 'em dead.


6 comments:

A.C. McCloud said...

Down here we have an AM-talker who uses CBS radio news on the half-hour. It's amazing how surreptitiously slanted they are in reporting the news headlines. Nothing new, just amazing because we've got so many other options to buffer them with today. I still don't think they understand that.

Mustang said...

My hard-headed son insisted on pursuing a degree in journalism. The truth is that he is an excellent writer, but refused to acknowledge that the field of journalism is one of the most competitive of all job markets in this country — which means, low starting salaries and an OJT program that stifles, rather than encourages creativity. He would tell me that in college, his professors continually stressed that a good journalist has no national loyalty or patriotism, since those are bogus attributes. Apparently, a side benefit to attending college at the University of Texas is that in addition to a sheepskin, you also walk off the stage with a liberal “hate America and all it stands for” bias. Not surprisingly, he today leans to the liberal side of the political spectrum even though he did not pursue a career in journalism.

I am not surprised that CBS is looking for someone who is “wicked smart, funny, irreverent and hip, oozing enthusiasm and creative energy. This position requires strong people, reporting, story telling and writing skills. Managing tight deadlines should be second nature. Knowledge of the enviro-beat is a big plus, but not a requirement.” I’m not sure what wicked smart means, but I think I get the picture with respect to “irreverent.” We definitely need more people in the world who are disrespectful of other views, unwilling to listen to anything but their preconceived notions, and people are willing to edit sound bites until the get a desired effect.

Yep . . . nothing is too good for CBS.

L'Amerloque said...

Hi LASunsett !


/*/ But we'd like to think that when we are getting information, the one putting out the information is a person that knows something about the information being put out./*/


The Wiki article (http://tinyurl.com/ymy4wc) says it all …


//However in the UK, ITN's presenters are referred to as newscasters (and have been since the 1950s), whilst those working at the BBC are called newsreaders./


Amerloque has never seen a British job spec stating that a news presenter or a newscaster or a newsreader is expected to know something about the subject, so perhaps they in the UK have no such scruples …


Some of the French newsreaders are pretty lousy, too: it's an international disease. (wider grin)


Best,
L'Amerloque

LASunsett said...

AC,

//Down here we have an AM-talker who uses CBS radio news on the half-hour. It's amazing how surreptitiously slanted they are in reporting the news headlines.//

Have you ever seen one of those 60 Minutes reports with Scott Pelley? What a condescending and biased judgementalist he is.

LASunsett said...

Mustang,

//My hard-headed son insisted on pursuing a degree in journalism.//

As you know, my son is studying journalism. He wants to be a sports writer.

Before he declared that as his major, I made sure he understood that he would not start out writing for Sports Illustrated, but rather would likely be writing about Friday night HS football for some Podunk Gazette.

He said he understood.

We'll see.

LASunsett said...

Amerloque,

//Amerloque has never seen a British job spec stating that a news presenter or a newscaster or a newsreader is expected to know something about the subject, so perhaps they in the UK have no such scruples …//

I would think reading the news would only require the person be able to read. It's the special reports that I would hope the person reporting and asking the tough questions would have some level of expertise.

Of course judging from some doctors I have known throughout the years, there could be some quack giving medical advice on TV because he couldn't practice medicine worth a damn.

I guess either way, it's a crap shoot.