Monday, May 01, 2006

Son Of Shah Plans Overthrow Of Iranian Government

From Human Events Online comes this article, complete with excerpts from a recent interview with Reza Pahlavi, son of the late Shah of Iran. (Hat Tip to Drudge) This is a must read article.

You can certainly bet that this will not set well with the mullahs and what has become the daily threat factory, also known as the Iranian government. In fact, he can probably expect a fatwa sometime soon. But in addition to the Iranian government, the UN and their biggest fans (the American and European left) will be unhappy, as will the Russians and the Chinese.

The truth is, this would be the best-case scenario for Iran and for the entire world. That is, as long as son of shah remembers the mistakes of his father and installs a constitutional monarchy, with power given to a democratically elected legislature. If he does not do so, the Iranian people will be trading one form of tyrranny for another, just like they did when the islamists overthrew dad and many other similar instances throughout history.

Long-term stability and prosperity is highly dependent upon the existence of such democratic institutions. That is an immutable truth.

6 comments:

All_I_Can_Stands said...

Go Son of Shah! You are right about Russia and China. Look for them to assist in preventing this from happening. Also, look for the UN to denounce him. With friends like these....

LASunsett said...

Like I said, first comes the fatwa, then comes the denouncements from the others that care nothing about the bulk of the Iranian people and the misery they must endure under this oppressive regime.

Always On Watch said...

The truth is, this would be the best-case scenario for Iran and for the entire world. That is, as long as son of shah remembers the mistakes of his father and installs a constitutional monarchy, with power given to a democratically elected legislature.

A "democratically elected legislature" sounds good. But we must remember that Hamas was elected to power through the democratic process. Also, the Muslim Brotherhood--granddaddy of many terrorist offshoots--is enjoying a resurgence of power via elections.

And all of us are familiar with the shari'ah-law democracy in Iraq and the case of Abdul Rahman. Shari'ah law trumps personal freedom and the Afghan constitution.

I sound negative, I know. But on a positive note...the shah's son has the right idea about democracy.

The big question is if the mullahs will allow a secular Islamic government. The problems with the mullahs go back for centuries, and these mullahs are very protective of their power.

BTW, former CIA Director Woolsey spoke at the symposium I attended last weekend. He advocates not trying to use Rafsanjani and his followers to oust the present regime of Iran; I'm guessing that he meant that the son of the shah and his exiled followers are the only choice for hope of peace with Iran.

Shah Alexander said...

Reza Pahlavi has been acting for Iranian democracy. He appears in leading Western media. It is important that he establish successful alliances with prominent activists like Maryam Rajavi in London and Shirin Ebadi in Tehran.

When he comes back, things will be completely different from those in his father's era. During the Cold War, the United States needed to compromise with authoritarian regimes in order to defeat communists. Now, promotion of democracy is a vital agenda in American foreign policy.

Reza Pahlavi will play different roles in a possible "New Iran."

Always On Watch said...

Shah,
Reza Pahlavi will play different roles in a possible "New Iran."

If he can come to power, that is. And even then, any possible Iranian constitution must not allow for shari'ah law.

LASunsett said...

AOW, I tend to agree with you. I am not saying, it's not possible. It's just not probable. But hey, I got both the NCAA Football and Basketball Championships wrong. So a prophet, I am not.

Shah,

When he comes back, things will be completely different from those in his father's era.

In one sense, you are right. I think that times have changed in that, many young people have never lived under anything but oppression and they are curious what freedom really feels like.

But in the other sense, the same elements that rose to power and ousted his father, are still firmly entrenched and will not let go, without plunging the country into a bloody civil war.

Time will tell.