Monday, September 24, 2007

Iranian President's Big Day In America

Many aren't happy he's here and plan to communicate it.

Critics of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad started protesting even before the hardline leader made his scheduled arrival in New York for planned speeches at a high-profile university and the United Nations that have aroused a storm of opposition.


But, as you may guess, he has his big day planned for a day when most people have to work. So the only ones that can turn out in force are students or those that do not have to make a living. Because of this I do not think the crowds will be as large, had he turned up on, say, a Saturday.

But if his very presence isn't enough to anger decent people, here we have a dean at a prestigious university defending their invitation to have him speak:





Imagine how Jewish students must feel about this.

At Columbia, the military is not welcome, the minutemen are not welcome. But the head of a terrorist state is welcome and now apparently, Hitler would be, if he were still alive.

That's the hypocrisy of the Elitist Left.

11 comments:

Greg said...

Oh, LAS, relax. He's not going to say anything more outrageously anti-semitic or anti-American than that which is taught everyday in Columbia's "middle east studies" classes.

No, seriously.

ALLAIN JULES COMMUNICATION said...

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is right !

Greg said...

Cool! A real, live Ahmadinejad supporter (who, not surprisingly, does not live in Iran)!

But, what, specifically, is Mr. Ahmadinejad right about, Allain? Everything?

rocket said...

Greg,

Don't surf around too much to find who this guy is. All kinds of casino adds come up on his links and craps up the computer.

Seems to be a Scandal Sheet wanabbee

Greg said...

Ugh, too late, rocket. Hopefully, I'm not infected. Another thing that bugs me with some blogs - once you are on, you can't use "Back" to get out (not the case on Allain's blog, afaik).

Anyway, I think it's funny that the debate about Ahmadinejad centers around his "right to free speech." Why? It should center around Americans' right to free assembly (same Amendment, at least). Some Americans may choose to have him in for tea to "exchange ideas" about how the Jews are devouring the earth. Others may stand outside and protest. He's one of the most repugnant figures on earth, but he can't hurt us by speaking at Columbia. He might hurt Columbia's and Iran's reputation....

After having the weekend + to consider it, I've come to think we should have allowed him to visit Ground Zero and announce all the things America did to deserve 9/11. Again - does it hurt us in some way, or just make the leaders of Iran look like the terrorist-supporting thugs that they are?

Greg said...

So, I just read the reports on the mini-Hitler's speech at Columbia U. He again defended "European scholars'" rights to question the Holocaust. And then he questioned the true version of 9/11. He a truther! Why am I not surprised?

Seriously, let's let this guy talk and talk and talk. It's not doing his country any good, or our's any harm. What a loser.

LASunsett said...

Greg,

It's not the fact that he spoke, it's the fact that they censor the ROTC and the minutemen, yet allow him to speak. That's what irks me.

LASunsett said...

Allain,

What's he right about?

If you are going to post garbage here at least have the common courtesy to explain your delusions.

Mark said...

Seriously, let's let this guy talk and talk and talk. It's not doing his country any good, or our's any harm. What a loser.

Yes. He's not doing his country any good, or our's any harm.

Hopefully this good reasoning prevails come the talks of bombing and invading Tehran.

LASunsett said...

Hi Mark,

//Hopefully this good reasoning prevails come the talks of bombing and invading Tehran.//

I know of no one beating the drums for war right now. Before we ever get to that point, sanctions must be given a chance to work. But right now, we have a bunch of EU and UN bureaucrats balking at sanctions. Only Sarkozy seems to recognize the need for them. How ironic is that?

I think the world would be quite surprised at how effective sanctions would be, right now. But, if we wait too long, they won't be of much use. They certainly won't work after they have a bomb.

Greg said...

It's not the fact that he spoke, it's the fact that they censor the ROTC and the minutemen, yet allow him to speak. That's what irks me.

Well, of course. I'm not really defending Columbia U.

Although I think everything worked out well - that Ahmadinewhackjob made a fool of himself and his nation and that American protesters did us proud (note - unlike during Iran's innumerable military marches, no one called for the "Death of [insert country here]") - I thought these comments from the Columbia U deans of the law school and business school do a good job of presenting the argument against allowing him to speak:

Law school dean: This event raises deep and complicated issues about how best to express our commitment to intellectual freedom, and to our free way of life. Although we believe in free and open debate at Columbia and should never suppress points of view, we are also committed to academic standards. A high-quality academic discussion depends on intellectual honesty but, unfortunately, Mr. Ahmadinejad has proven himself, time and again, to be uninterested in whether his words are true. Therefore, my personal opinion is that he should not be invited to speak. Mr. Ahmadinejad is a reprehensible and dangerous figure who presides over a repressive regime, is responsible for the death of American soldiers, denies the Holocaust, and calls for the destruction of Israel. It would be deeply regrettable if some misread this invitation as lending prestige or legitimacy to his views.

B-school: Some would argue that a University should be a place of intellectual freedom and open debate, but others ­ including me argue that Mr. Ahmadinejad, who is responsible for the death of American soldiers, denies the Holocaust, and calls for the destruction of Israel, has proven himself incapable of engaging in a true and honest academic discussion.

Great debate. Something that would never happen in Ahmadinejad's Iran.